Wednesday October 18 , 2017

Fire Prevention

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2018 Fire Prevention Week is Sunday October 7th through Saturday October 13th

Fire Prevention Week

2016 Fire Prevention Week banner

This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Don’t Wait – Check the Date! Replace Smoke Alarms Every 10 Years,” represents the final year of our three-year effort to educate the public about basic but essential elements of smoke alarm safety.

Why focus on smoke alarms three years in a row? Because NFPA’s survey data shows that the public has many misconceptions about smoke alarms, which may put them at increased risk in the event of a home fire. For example, only a small percentage of people know how old their smoke alarms are, or how often they need to be replaced.

As a result of those and related findings, we’re addressing smoke alarm replacement this year with a focus on these key messages:

  • Smoke alarms should be replaced every 10 years.
  • Make sure you know how old all the smoke alarms are in your home.
  • To find out how old a smoke alarm is, look at the date of manufacture on the back of the alarm; the alarm should be replaced 10 years from that date.

Remember to clean those chimney flues and review emergency escape routes with your children in case of fire.
  • Plan two escape routes out of each room.
  • Practice fire drills at least twice a year.
  • Teach family members to stay low to the ground when escaping from a fire.
  • Teach family members never to open doors that are hot. In a fire, feel the bottom of the door with the palm of your hand. If it is hot, do not open the door. Find another way out.
  • Install smoke detectors on every level of your home. Clean and test them at least once a month. Change batteries at least once a year.
  • Keep a whistle in each bedroom to awaken household in case of fire.
  • Check electrical outlets. Do not overload outlets.
  • Purchase and learn how to use a fire extinguisher (5 lb., A-B-C type).
  • Have a collapsible ladder on each upper floor of your house.

John Paulding Engine Company #1 Fire Prevention Officer Randy Weber and the JPEC Fire Prevention Squad participated in the Orangetown Parks and Recreation Family Movie Night

Fire Safety

What You Should Do:

  • Plan two escape routes out of each room.
  • Practice fire drills at least twice a year.
  • Teach family members to stay low to the ground when escaping from a fire.
  • Teach family members never to open doors that are hot. In a fire, feel the bottom of the door with the palm of your hand. If it is hot, do not open the door. Find another way out.
  • Install smoke detectors on every level of your home. Clean and test them at least once a month. Change batteries at least once a year.
  • Keep a whistle in each bedroom to awaken household in case of fire.
  • Check electrical outlets. Do not overload outlets.
  • Purchase and learn how to use a fire extinguisher (5 lb., A-B-C type).
  • Have a collapsible ladder on each upper floor of your house.
  • Consider installing home sprinklers.

Monument

IN MEMORY OF OUR

BROTHER FIREMEN

WHO HAVE ANSWERED

THE LAST CALL

Courtesy of 44-Control

2017 Incidents
Jan 10
Feb 7
Mar 19
Apr 10
May 13
Jun 11
Jul 8
Aug 9
Sept 15
Oct
Nov
Dec
Total 102

Call History

2016 162
2015 139
2014 151
2013 159
2012 160
2011 180